Sunday, July 16, 2006

 

Preparing the county to cope with climate change, as Sims is doing, "is exactly what leaders are for"

Preparing the county to cope with climate change, as Sims is doing, "is exactly what leaders are for," says William Ruckelshaus, the first U.S. Environmental Protection Agency administrator and a Medina resident.

A great example for us, showing us that it is possible to be a leader and give a city what Lansing needs more than anything else: leadership on the twin dilemmas of living in a society built on endless supplies of cheap energy when that cheap energy is no more, and figuring out how to deal with the consequences of having blown all the carbon in all that cheap energy into the atmosphere. 

If our response to the first problem is to simply shift to the cheapest fossil fuels (coal), then we are simply condemning the next generations to live with whatever wild climate disruption happens to result. 

It's time people understood something very important:

Global warming is all four horses of the apocalypse all in one, because it is likely to bring us wars, disease, famine, and pestilence in relentless waves.

It's encouraging to see some leadership on this issue--but where is that leadership in Lansing?
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http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/PrintStory.pl?document_id=2003121242&zsection_id=2002111777&slug=sims12m&date=20060712


Global warming: They're not laughing at Ron Sims now

By Keith Ervin
Seattle Times staff reporter

The first time Ron Sims tried to set up a county office to study the effects of global warming, he was mocked.

A Seattle Times editorial said King County Council members Sims and co-sponsor Bruce Laing were belching "hyperbolic clouds of rhetorical gas," and suggested they instead buy some tomato plants and steer manure.

"The point is," wrote the amused editorialist, "that the sky-is-falling, icecaps-are-melting, oceans-are-rising rhetoric must be tempered by common sense." With little support for the idea from the environmental community and none from council colleagues, the proposal quickly disappeared.

That was 1988, before rising temperatures, increasing carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, and melting ice sheets persuaded most of the scientific community that the planet is undergoing potentially disastrous climate change caused by human activity.

Now county executive, Sims has set up a climate-response planning team — and no one is laughing. Long admired by environmentalists, but previously unable to make the case that a local official should poke his nose into a planet-sized problem, Sims is drawing national attention for his efforts to reduce the county's greenhouse-gas emissions and prepare for the effects of climate change. .  .  .(snip)

Preparing the county to cope with climate change, as Sims is doing, "is exactly what leaders are for," says William Ruckelshaus, the first U.S. Environmental Protection Agency administrator and a Medina resident.


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